Going home harms my relationship with food. (Ep 111)

Are you having success with healing your relationship with food, but are worried that going back into a toxic environment will jeopardize your newfound peace? Listen now to get my tips on how to approach this part of the Food Peace™ journey.

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This episode is brought to you by my online course, Your Step-by-Step Guide to PCOS and Food Peace™. Sign up now to get on the waitlist for the next enrollment period in April, and receive my FREE road map: Your First 3 Steps Toward Food Peace™ with PCOS. You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how.

This episode is also brought to you by my new Fat-Positive Dietitian t-shirt and mug! All proceeds go to funding this labor of love to keep it as a free resource for you.

Product links may be affiliate. If you click and make a purchase, there’s no extra cost to you.

The transcribed episode can be found here.

Episode’s Key Points:

  • Our relationship with food is a window into our unmet needs!
  • Instead of trying to avoid vulnerability, try sticking with it. It will help you tap into your own innate wisdom, and help guide you towards what you need to do next.
  • It’s time to investigate our unmet need. Food can help distract us when we’re going through challenging times, but figuring out the unmet need can provide some lasting relief. This strategy is called the Food Decoding Method!
  • Chronic illness is a tough experience on everyone, not just the person struggling with the pain. Remember that, and give yourself some compassion.
  • Hardship and health conditions are difficult, but they are NOT caused by being in a larger body. There’s a relationship between body size and illness, but there’s no research out there to prove that being in a larger body leads to ill health. In fact, there are lots of factors, like weight stigma, that aren’t even considered in classic weight research.
  • Ending a relationship with your therapist is hard, but even going to a few sessions is worth it.
  • Explore the option of online therapy providers! Some of my colleagues doing virtual work include Christy Harrison, Erica Leon, and Paige Smathers.
  • You don’t have to have your shit together. Transitions are messy, and adjustments take time!

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

Thank you for listening to the Love, Food series.

I’m trying to embrace my body but finding it difficult in this moment. (Ep 109 with Haley Goodrich)

Have you struggled with yo-yo dieting, weight cycling, and weight gain? Are you trying to embrace your body, but finding it difficult in this moment? Listen now to hear Haley Goodrich and I tackle this part of the Food Peace™ journey.

Subscribe and leave a review here in just seconds.

This episode is brought to you by my online course, Your Step-by-Step Guide to PCOS and Food Peace™. Sign up now to get on the waitlist for the next enrollment period in April, and receive my FREE road map: Your First 3 Steps Toward Food Peace™ with PCOS. You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how

Product links may be affiliate. If you click and make a purchase, there’s no extra cost to you.

Episode’s Key Points:

  • Sometimes we may struggle with a disconnection from our body. Instead of listening to our internal cues, we focus on external measures like calories and other numbers. But we have to move away from this to find authentic health!
  • The world is still really stuck in diet culture, and so we have to guard ourselves against the messaging around us!
  • Support is ESSENTIAL to this process, especially from clinicians that understand Health at Every Size.
  • We have to be sure that we’re getting ENOUGH food every day, and that we’re finding satisfaction from our food experiences in order to feel truly satiated.
  • In this diet culture world, we actually might be UNDER eating! This can make our bodies think we’re starving, which leads to bingeing. Make sure you’re eating enough and eating a VARIETY of foods!
  • It’s also important to make sure that we’ve fully made peace with ALL foods! This is a part of intuitive eating, and will help you to balance your eating behaviors. Having true permission to eat can transform your relationship with food and can even help you to honor your body overall, which can help support body acceptance and body respect.
  • Common aches and pains happen to people in ALL body sizes! If someone blames your knee pain on your size, they’re being fatphobic, PERIOD!! By allowing your body to be where it wants to be, you’re actually giving yourself the best opportunity to heal.
  • All of diet culture is about MONEY!

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

Thank you for listening to the Love, Food series.

Body Positive PCOS New Year Resolutions

Kimberly Singh, Julie’s resident nutrition grad student {{ also affected by PCOS! }} is back to blogging on PCOS topics. Enjoy!

Are you tired of new year resolutions related to weight loss yet wonder what else to focus on?

As the new year approaches you may find yourself surrounded by diet culture at its annual peak. This is particularly difficult time to avoid diets.

Here are are 5 New Year’s resolutions that will help your PCOS while maintaining a weight-neutral approach.

Experiment with giving yourself permission to eat.

Allow yourself to eat without restriction and rules. This is scary at first, but eliminating the rules will allow you to better listen to your body.

Take a leap of faith, and trust yourself to shake off the rules created by diet culture.

Eliminating food rules will even make eating a more wholesome experience that creates space for connection, creativity, and warmth around food.

Engage in movement that brings you joy.

Let your body be present and fully engaged in movement. Move in a way that lets you feel connected to your body.

Strip away the judgments about stamina, duration, and frequency.

Simply let your body be.

Eat enough protein.

Julie recommends that people with PCOS experiment with eating 10 to 20 grams of protein in the morning and evening. Shift your focus away from labeling foods as good versus bad, and focus on eating enough.

Observe how this change affects your energy levels and PCOS symptoms.

I have found it helpful to create a list of go-to meals with enough protein. I like to be ready for the unexpected, so my go-to meals range from take-out to super fancy recipes.

Observe how your body reacts to different foods.

Be your own scientist as your discover how to best manage your PCOS.

Be a neutral observer as you explore how you feel after you eat different types of foods. You may find it helpful to take notes throughout this process. Observe how specific foods affect your energy levels, mood, and appetite.

Remind yourself that you can use this information as you please. This does not mean that you have to eliminate any foods that do not leave you completely energized and satisfied.

Don’t be scared to say, “no.”

Say “no” to people, ideas, and healthcare professionals that are not serving you and your PCOS experience. Listen to your gut instinct.

Stepping away from experiences that are not serving you will create space for experiences that are aligned with your values.

Want to find a way to treat your PCOS without dieting?

How do I get my family to understand my Food Peace™ journey? {Ep 98 with Carolyn Ross}

Are the people around you supportive of your food peace journey? Have you found a better way with intuitive eating, but are coming up against a roadblock with family and friends? Listen now for some tips on how to approach this part of the food peace journey.

Subscribe and leave a review here in just seconds.

This episode is brought to you by my online course, Your Step-by-Step Guide to PCOS and Food Peace. Sign up now to get on the waitlist for the next enrollment period in January 2018, and receive my FREE road map: Your First 3 Steps Toward Food Peace with PCOS. You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how.

Episode’s Key Points:

  • Making peace with food is RADICAL! It’s truly a political act, and this can cause issues within our family relationships.
  • Health is about FLEXIBILITY!!
  • Dr. Carolyn Ross joins us to talk about the family, and how to manage family members who try to be our food police.
  • Food rules contribute to the development of eating disorders, especially if there’s a perceived “weight problem.”
  • Make sure not to go too long without eating throughout the day, and add some movement into your life to enhance how your body feels!
  • Intercept questions about your food choices and your body size by making some healthy boundaries. Let them know you’re working on things with a doctor or dietitian, and leave it at that.
  • You’re allowed to be angry! Feel your feelings, and don’t feel like you have to push them down to appease family members.
  • Remember, many of us struggle with internalized fatphobia. Be sure to address this with a treatment provider so that you can work through it!
  • Our weight research is super biased!! You can be healthy at any size… it depends on our BEHAVIORS, not our weight.
  • Research shows that the healthiest weight you can be is “slightly overweight!!”
  • The medical profession changes slowly and shifts in the medical community take time. The status quo will change eventually!
  • Permission promotes health, and shame only brings us down.

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

Thank you for listening to the Love, Food series.

Which PCOS type are you?

This article was written by my previous Nutrition Grad Student, Kimmie Singh. She is a fat woman of color who experiences PCOS. You can find out more information about her work now as a dietitian here.

People with PCOS share many similar experiences, yet there is quite a bit of variation among the PCOS experience.

Why do people with PCOS have different symptoms? 

Why is there body diversity among the PCOS community if we all have the same condition? 

Will the same medications help everyone? 

The questions are endless!

Research has demonstrated people with PCOS can be separated in four different categories depending on three basic PCOS symptoms:

  • inconsistent and/or lack of ovulation (oligo/anovulation),
  • increased male sex hormones (hyperandrogenism),
  • and the presence of cysts on ovaries (polycystic ovaries).

Yes, you read that correctly, having cysts on your ovaries is not a requirement to having PCOS. One study identified the following four types of PCOS, and these four types have built the foundation for understanding the general differences between people with PCOS:

Oligo/

anovulation

Hyper-

androgenism

Polycystic

ovaries

Classic polycystic ovary PCOS                X                X              X
Classic non-polycystic ovary PCOS                X                X
Non-classic ovulatory PCOS                X              X
Non-classic mild PCOS                X              X

Since these types of PCOS were identified many researchers examined what other symptoms vary between the types.

Want to find a way to treat your PCOS without dieting?

Grab a FREE download from Julie here.

 

The classic polycystic ovary PCOS is the most prevalent type of PCOS, and, unfortunately, it is associated with the most negative health outcomes. People with this type of PCOS are more likely to experience more severe insulin resistance (more on that here). They are also at an increased risk of having unhealthy lipid panels.

All three types of PCOS that have hyperandrogenism are at an increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease.

There are also hormonal differences between the types. One study found that people with classic polycystic ovary PCOS have higher testosterone levels than the other types.

There have been some studies that compared the body sizes and shapes between the types of people with PCOS. Most studies find that people with the Classic polycystic ovary PCOS are most likely to have larger bodies and carry more weight around the midsection.

Although the research on body diversity and PCOS is super scarce, this is such a great indicator that people with PCOS should not be expected to have a particular body type. I have heard so many people suggest that if there are thin people with PCOS then all people with PCOS should and can be thin. This is false for any population- especially for people with PCOS.

Differentiating between types of PCOS gives me hope for the future of PCOS research. So many people with PCOS feel disappointed with the quality of healthcare of treatment options available.

I hope that by better understanding different PCOS experiences, future treatment options will be more individualized.

Want to better understand your PCOS? Take a deep dive into PCOS management without dieting. Julie’s course can show you how. Details here.

 

References

Aziz, M., Sidelmann, J. J., Faber, J., Wissing, M. M., Naver, K. V., Mikkelsen, A., . . .

Skouby, S. O. (2015). Polycystic ovary syndrome: cardiovascular risk factors according to specific phenotypes. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 94, 1082-1089. doi:10.1111/aogs.12706

Clark, N. M., Podolski, A. J., Brooks, E. D., Chizen, D. R., Pierson, R. A., Lehotay, D. C., &

Lujan, M. E. (2014). Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Phenotypes Using Updated Criteria for Polycystic Ovarian Morphology. Reproductive Sciences, 21(8), 1034-1043. doi:10.1177/1933719114522525

Hayek, S. E., Bitar, L., Hamdar, L. H., Mirza, F. G., & Daoud, G. (2016). Poly Cystic

Ovarian Syndrome: An Updated Overview. Frontiers in Physiology, 7. doi:10.3389/fphys.2016.00124

Jamil, A. S., Alalaf, S. K., Al-Tawil, N. G., & Al-Shawaf, T. (2015). A case–control

observational study of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome among the

four phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome based on Rotterdam criteria. Reproductive Health, 12(1). doi:10.1186/1742-4755-12-7

Jamil, A. S., Alalaf, S. K., Al-Tawil, N. G., & Al-Shawaf, T. (2015). Comparison of clinical

and hormonal characteristics among four phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome based on the Rotterdam criteria. Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 293(2), 447-456. doi:10.1007/s00404-015-3889-5

Pehlivanov, B., & Orbetzova, M. (2007). Characteristics of different phenotypes of

polycystic ovary syndrome in a Bulgarian population. Gynecological Endocrinology, 23(10), 604-609. doi:10.1080/09513590701536246

Sahmay, S., Atakul, N., Oncul, M., Tuten, A., Aydogan, B., & Seyisoglu, H. (2013).

Serum anti-mullerian hormone levels in the main phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome. European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, 170(1), 157-161. doi:10.1016/j.ejogrb.2013.05.019