(214) How does food insecurity and disability affect Food Peace? (with Veronica Garnett)

Most people with a complicated relationship with food are at diet rock bottom yet what if you have never dieted? Experiences with food insecurity that will have a similar effect. This is a valid place on the Food Peace Journey™ and let’s discuss Intuitive Eating tools to aid your recovery with guest expert Veronica Garnett @DiasporadicalKitchen on Instagram.

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This episode is brought to you by my courses: PCOS and Food Peace and Dietitians PCOS and Food Peace. You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how.

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Do you own a social justice informed business? Are you a fat positive business owner? I would like to give you the first opportunity to advertise on the Love Food Podcast. Check out the details here: JulieDillonRD.com/LoveFoodSponsor

This episode’s Dear Food letter:

Deer food,
I’ve struggled with you pretty much all of my life. I never dieted but I have always been a rebel. I hid food, snook it, or just ate too much in general. At least it’s what other people would call too much. I’m also visually impaired. Dieting just seems ridiculous to me especially since I couldn’t read calories or other food label information. Of course I could’ve had someone read it to me but I could never see myself giving up sweets.  or even cutting back. I don’t like fast food. One of the stereotypes of fat people or people in larger bodies is that they eat too much fast food. This wasn’t true for me. My mom loved cooking when she had time but she rarely did. She worked a lot. When she would cook most of the food would go to waste because my brother, sister, and stepdad always wanted fast food. If my mom is at work and there wasn’t any money to be used on fast food my stepdad would cook something but no sides. It never felt enough. Now I can eat chicken with out the side and it’s no big deal but that then I always wanted my mom’s good side dishes. We were also pretty poor. Food insecurity was hard. They were also times were my stepdad sister and sometimes my brother would leave and not tell me. Most the time it would be to go to pick my mom up from work but sometimes it would be to go to other places. If my mom wasn’t with them and they would stop and get food during those times they were either forget about me or get me something that I didn’t wind up liking. I’m kind of a picky eater. My mom would remember to always make sure it was something I liked if they would stop and get fast food. I also went to the Maryland school for the blind during weekdays starting through my fifth grade year. It was pretty good there because there was always good food around or at least I would have peanut butter and bread to make a sandwich. I was disappointed that there were less snacks but at least there were some and I wouldn’t feel like I would have to eat them quick to keep them from being on within the next day or two because of my brothers friends Who would come over. Speaking of my brother, he also bullied me about my weight. That’s when most of the rebellion really amped up. There is a lot more in my childhood and young adult life that led to a bad relationship with food such as the times when I helped my friend out with food when she lost her food stamp card and we live together but they didn’t help me when they found it. I was stuck eating just mashed potatoes and crackers during those times. I digress though for the sake of time.
Just a few months ago I found out about Intuit is eating and health at every size. I came to it because of a book that was recommended to me to deal with the triggering conversations that were happening about my weight. One of those triggering conversations was with my uncle Tom who is one of the nicest and most beautiful people but he still caught up in diet culture because doesn’t want me to diet but he does want me to cut my portions back and he expects that I lose weight. I know the main reason is because he’s afraid of losing me because I’m the only one he trusts. My question to food is how can I begin to incorporate these things when I’ve never really dieted. How do I keep myself from trying to prove to him and others that I am becoming healthier? How do I fit in to these new paradigms? Also, how can I introduce people to these new paradigms when I’m not very articulate with when it comes to remembering definitions and statistics that will prove that these new ways of doing things are valid?
Yours truly:
Partially blind fat friend

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

(176) I’m supposed to be a perfect eater (with Kimmie Singh)

Listen to the latest Love Food Episode with guest expert Kimmie Singh RD

Do you feel the pressure to eat “good” all the time? Are you in a role where you are expected to be healthy and eat in a way to prove it? Those who study or are in dietetics, medicine, nursing, and other health related fields will easily relate yet just about everyone will relate to the pressure. Listen as we sift through ways to get through with guest expert Kimmie Singh.

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Looking for more Food Peace? Want to help support the Love Food Podcast? Check out my new After the Letters Project on Patreon. I have exclusive weekly mini-episodes for $29/month and other freebies. Find more at Patreon.com/LoveFoodPodcast

This episode is brought to you by my courses: PCOS and Food Peace and Dietitians PCOS and Food Peace. You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how.

This episode’s Dear Food letter:

Dear Food, 

I am writing this email as I am on my own personal journey with food peace and body acceptance. I am a dietetics student well into my studies academically and have had some observations as well as personal growth along the way. About a year ago, I began going to therapy and there it was revealed that I undoubtable struggle with orthorexic and disordered eating behaviors. This was, in a sense, such a relief to hear. It put a label to what I was going through and allowed me to set the path of self-improvement within my life. 

Although, actually putting in the work and committing to recovery was something that I could not have prepared myself for. This is something that I am still working towards today. At any rate, this brings me to what I want to talk about, which is how isolating this struggle can be in my major. I am surrounded by people, mostly women, who are expected to have a perfect relationship with food. However, I have a sinking suspicion that this is far from the case. I am living in a world surrounded by well-meaning individuals who are smart, inspiring, and dedicated. And obsessed with food. 

At the time, I felt extremely alone in my struggle. I felt as though no one else knew what I was going through because dietetics students are held to the highest of all standards. We are expected to have everything together, including our relationship with food. Now, a year into my recovery journey, I am becoming more and more concerned that the discussion of eating disorders is missing from our education. I think as people who are so enveloped in the study of food, we need to be allowed room to heal our relationship with the societal expectation that we should be “perfect.” Furthermore, we need room as individuals to heal our relationships with our own bodies, as well as our knowledge of fat stigma and shaming. We need to be allowed to un-learn commonly held beliefs surrounding weight and health. 

Unfortunately, everything mentioned above is missing from the dietetic curriculum, at least at my school. As I continue on in my own food peace journey, I am left confused and frustrated that we, as future professionals within the field, are left out of the discussion on eating disorders. As a result, we are entering the field with an oversimplified and possibly harmful outlook on people’s relationship with food. 

Sincerely, 

Captivated & Concerned 

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

(174) How do I challenge diet talk? (with Cara Harbstreet)

Latest Love Food Podcast Episode features guest expert Cara Harbstreet

While on your Food Peace journey, are you feeling powerful fighting diet culture yet deflated every time someone else brings up diet talk? Wonder how to best handle verbalized fat phobia? Let’s huddle to help you decide what your next steps look like in this latest Love Food Podcast episode with special guest Cara Harbstreet.

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Looking for more Food Peace? Want to help support the Love Food Podcast? Check out my new After the Letters Project on Patreon. I have exclusive weekly mini-episodes for $29/month and other freebies. Find more at Patreon.com/LoveFoodPodcast

This episode is brought to you by my courses: PCOS and Food Peace and Dietitians PCOS and Food Peace. You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how.

This episode’s Dear Food letter:

Dear Food,

We’ve had a complicated relationship for as long as I can remember. I have always felt guilty when eating you and blamed you for my oversized body (according to society’s standards). My guilt and shame turned into a full fledged eating disorder, which I was entrenched in for years. I was diagnosed with anorexia in 2015 after years of restricting, over exercising, and hating myself. I finally agreed to get help from professionals, which meant having to eat a lot of you food. I was forced to eat what I considered my “bad” foods or “off limit” foods and refrain from exercise. It took years to restore my weight and countless appointments with my dietician, doctor, and therapist. It was and still is the hardest battle I have ever had to fight.

Here I am now, in 2019, and still have a difficult time with you. I still overthink you and I worry that you will always have control over my life. But I have also come a long way in understanding our relationship and the distorted thoughts I have about you. I have recently felt a strong desire to fight against diet culture. You see food, I am about to enter the field of professional counseling and my hope is to help people understand you better and become less fearful of you. I want people to enjoy you and honor the body they live in, without being on a diet. I want that for myself and for others. 

Though, as empowered as I feel, I am stuck. I have a hard time listening to people talk about you, diets, and weight. It makes me cringe and I don’t know how to address you in conversations in a respectful and knowledgeable manner. Unfortunately, the conversation of you and weight occur far too often. I usually just ignore what I am hearing and don’t get involved because I am scared of how others will react when I tell them I am on your side and that you are not the real problem. What do I say to them? How do I enter a conversation about you, body image, and scales when I am against the norm? How do we as Food Peace soldiers push back on diet culture on a daily basis? How do we respond to our family and friends when they sit and talk about you and restricting you? How do we help people understand that diets are so harmful to our bodies and that we deserve so much more? How do we help people see that Food Peace is possible and it does not include restriction or being on a diet? 

I want so badly to tell the world that everything they have heard and learned about diets and you is a big lie. I want to help people find body acceptance and break free of the shame and guilt they feel around you, but I don’t know how. HELP! 

Yours truly,

Stuck and Fed Up.

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

(159) [Rebroadcast] The PCOS and Food Peace Podcast

Tired of diets that don’t work to treat your PCOS?

Feel chaotic around food yet think you HAVE to diet?

Feel shame for your food cravings, bingeing, and body size while living with PCOS?

We have a podcast for you.

Kimmie Singh and I have put together 10 special episodes to form the PCOS and Food Peace Podcast. Each chapter features an interesting person affected by PCOS and their lived experiences. We also sort through a listener question within each episode on topics like exercise, cravings, mental health, infertility, finding good doctors, diabetes, and so much more!

This particular episode on this page is a great place to start. It gives you all the meaty details about the show and a glimpse into each episode.

Let us know what you think!

The PCOS and Food Peace Podcast is brought to you by Julie’s PCOS and Food Peace course. Get 25% off using the coupon code ‘podcast’ at check out. Get all the details here:

Did you enjoy the podcast? Leave us a rating, review, subscribe or share the podcast! Doing these small acts of kindness help the show grow and connect more with the concept of Food Peace.

Notes:

Thank you to Theralogix, the makers of Ovasitol, for sponsoring the podcast.

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  • In convenient powder form, Ovasitol can be enjoyed in your favorite beverage or smoothie.
  • Available in both a canister and convenient single-serving packets, Ovasitol contains 100% pure inositols, with no additives.
  • Read our blog post about what Inositols can do to help your PCOS.
  • Order online today at theralogix.com. During checkout, use “PRC” code 127410 for an exclusive PCOS and Food Peace Podcast discount.

(158) I don’t love every part of my body. Can I still pursue Food Peace? (with Vaughn Darst)

Are you on your path toward Food Peace™ yet struggling with accepting a part of your body? Do you live in a body that gets misgendered including in recovery spaces? You can have access to Food Peace too. Listen to expert guest Vaughn Darst as he explores this part of the journey on the latest episode and season 3 finale of the Love Food Podcast.

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This episode is brought to you by my courses: PCOS and Food Peace and Dietitians PCOS and Food Peace. You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how.

I want to share the work going on within Decolonizing Fitness. The person behind it, Ilya Parker, is a trans person of color Physical Therapist Assistant and Medical Exercise Coach with over 13 years of rehabilitative and functional training experience. He is a social justice advocate and educator whose work centers gender, racial and healing justice.

He decided to merge his love for restorative based movement practices and community advocacy to create Decolonizing Fitness, LLC; which is a social justice platform that provides affirming fitness services, community education and apparel in support of body diversity. Check out www.decolonizingfitness.com.

This episode’s Dear Food letter:

Dear Food,

We’ve had a rough ride. The past 5 years have been a constant flux of hating you, loving you, wanting you, needing you, abandoning you, and re-discovering you, all the while changing the body in which relates to you. Though it really didn’t change a lot at all; in fact it’s stayed relatively the same, but this un-changing body can just looks so different. On different days, in different mirrors, in different rooms, at different times, with different people, after different meals, it looks so different and I’m not sure which to believe anymore. I’ve come to accept this changing perception and try my best to give way to the kinder ones and not give much room to the less friendly ones. This has helped me come to a much better stage in my recovery and my relation to you (Food).
 
But there’s something I feel pulling me back into unhealthy thought patterns and coping strategies.I’m a non-binary trans people who has not been through any physical transition processes yet and, although I’ve managed to accept many parts of my body that I have felt hatred towards previously, I find it impossible too accept it as a whole. Because there are parts that I unequivocally don’t want, for example breasts, and so I don’t feel I can experience my body as a whole. At least not as long as I still experience this kind of dysphoria.
 
The thing is, Food, I don’t feel like I can resolve my relationship with you and move forward in my recovery while I can’t resolve my relationship with my body and my gender dysphoria. The part that I struggle with the most is that there is a distinct lack of resources and inclusion of trans people and bodies in rhetoric about eating disorders. Often, when I’m seeking help, I find myself confronted with invalidation of my gender identity and a sense of loneliness in my struggles. In fact, I tried to access counseling and they required everyone to take a nutritional information course first, in which they proceeded to mis-gender me and almost exclusively talked about anorexia and female body ideals as though that were the only issue in the room.
 
Now I know I’m not the only non-binary trans person to experience an eating disorder and/or gender dysphoria but I feel quite lost at sea in this struggle and don’t know where I’m suppose to swim to next.
 
Yours sincerely,
Drowning in Gender-norms

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!