(163) [Rebroadcast] Caroline Dooner on PCOS and Food Peace

While prepping for Season 4 of the Love Food Podcast, I am rebroadcasting conversations on PCOS and Food Peace. Listen as Kimmie Singh and I chat with Caroline Dooner, author of my favorite 2019 book The F*ck It Diet, on PCOS diet recommendations starting her eating disorder.

This Chapter of the PCOS and Food Peace Podcast is brought to you by Julie’s PCOS and Food Peace course. Get 25% off using the coupon code ‘podcast’ at check out. Get all the details here:

Did you enjoy the podcast? Leave us a rating, review, subscribe or share the podcast! Doing these small acts of kindness help the show grow and connect more with the concept of Food Peace.

Notes:

Thank you to Theralogix, the makers of Ovasitol, for sponsoring the podcast.

  • Ovasitol is an inositol supplement with a blend of myo-inositol and D-chiro-inositol, in the body’s optimal ratio of 40 to 1.
  • Inositols are nutrients that help to decrease insulin resistance, promote menstrual regularity, restore ovulation, and balance hormone levels.
  • In convenient powder form, Ovasitol can be enjoyed in your favorite beverage or smoothie.
  • Available in both a canister and convenient single-serving packets, Ovasitol contains 100% pure inositols, with no additives.
  • Read our blog post about what Inositols can do to help your PCOS.
  • Order online today at theralogix.com. During checkout, use “PRC” code 127410 for an exclusive PCOS and Food Peace Podcast discount.

PCOS + Insulin {Part 2}

This article was written by my previous Nutrition Grad Student, Kimmie Singh. She is a fat woman of color who experiences PCOS. You can find out more information about her work now as a dietitian here.

Now that you have background on the importance of insulin and glucose I’m going to explain how getting glucose in cells can be harder for people with PCOS.

Let’s dive in.

Most people with PCOS are insulin resistant. What’s that? Although the pancreas releases insulin after eating, the body doesn’t respond as expected. The body’s building blocks or cells that usually respond to insulin by taking up glucose from food rebel. They resist insulin in the bloodstream.

Why does this happen? We aren’t sure exactly. We do know that these cells end up without energy from the food just eaten.

This creates problems one of which the cells don’t get their primary source of energy. Also, the glucose in the bloodstream isn’t entering the cells, so it’s hanging out in the blood longer than it should be. This high level of glucose in the bloodstream causes the pancreas to make more insulin with hopes to get the cells to respond. They are hungry!

Want to find a way to treat your PCOS without dieting?

Grab a FREE download from Julie here.

Now there’s a lot going on: the energy-hungry cells need glucose, too much glucose in the blood bounces around causing havoc, and too much insulin in the bloodstream increases fat storage.

This process has your pancreas working overtime with half the pay.

It’s producing and pumping more insulin, yet blood sugar is still high and not getting into the cells for energy.

These long-term work conditions produce a pancreas unable to produce enough insulin to keep up with the body’s needs. This leads to the development of type 2 diabetes with PCOS.

Insulin resistance with PCOS can set the stage for:

  • carb cravings that make every cell in your body DEMAND you to polish off a plate of brownies.
  • very low energy levels
  • exercise that feels like you are carrying around a bag of rocks
  • more inflammation
  • poor ovulation
  • disrupted sleep
  • weight gain around the midsection

You may want to learn more about insulin resistance, and the Internet has a lot of great information about it. Warning: many sources suggest weight gain is a contributor to insulin resistance. Wrong.

For people with PCOS, research shows insulin resistance is likely to occur regardless of weight. And, if weight gain occurs, it is likely a result of the insulin resistance not the other way around.

Insulin resistance is tough.

It can seem as though the odds are against us, but we are a tough bunch. You can manage your insulin resistance and nourish your body without dieting. Learning about insulin resistance helped me better understand how my body is different and why I respond to foods differently than my friends without PCOS.

I feel empowered to understand how my body works, and I hope this information helps you feel empowered too!

Want to explore more non diet options to help manage your PCOS, promote health AND healing?

Click here for details on Julie’s PCOS and Food Peace course.

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No one understands my PCOS

This article was written by my previous Nutrition Grad Student, Kimmie Singh. She is a fat woman of color who experiences PCOS. You can find out more information about her work now as a dietitian here.

PCOS can feel isolating.

Many people are uncomfortable discussing sex-specific health conditions, and PCOS is no exception.

There is a stigma around it that creates the illusion that it should be packed away in a shame-filled cloud, only to be discussed under a doctor’s supervision. 

The symptoms related to PCOS-infertility, facial hair, menstrual irregularities, etc. are not always discussed in casual conversations, making PCOS seem like a big bad secret that people don’t want to talk about. However, in reality, PCOS is just another health condition, and infertility, facial hair, and menstrual irregularities are just symptoms.

Treating PCOS and its symptoms like they are inherently different or shameful makes it difficult for people with PCOS to connect.

Can you imagine if allergies were looked upon with the same attitude as PCOS? 

 

Want to find a way to treat your PCOS without dieting?

Grab a FREE download from Julie here.

 

This shame surrounding PCOS also makes it difficult to find support from other people with PCOS. I believe that a little support goes a long way.

Sometimes this support can come in the form of a friend, therapist, family member, or significant other. I have supportive people in my life, but the people that don’t have PCOS fail to understand what I experience.

Finding support from other people with PCOS can be helpful in sharing experiences, ideas, and encouragement. I also believe that it gives us a chance to learn from one another through our differences and similarities. On an even larger scale, we are stronger when we work together.

Together we can influence the future of PCOS research and treatment.

We can improve our health and medical care. Let’s discuss more ways to help us advocate for ourselves.

Want to explore more non diet options to help manage your PCOS, promote health AND healing?

Click here for details on Julie’s PCOS and Food Peace course.

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