(171) How do I explore Food Peace after weight loss surgery? (with Kirsten Ackerman)

Have you gone to drastic measures to heal your relationship with food? Wonder how to move away from diets after stomach surgery? Can you access Food Peace too? There is space for you in this conversation. Listen as I discuss this with fellow dietitian Kirsten Ackerman from Intuitive Bites podcast.

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Looking want more Food Peace? Want to help support the Love Food Podcast? Check out my new After the Letters Project on Patreon. I have exclusive weekly mini-episodes for $29/month and other freebies. Find more at Patreon.com/LoveFoodPodcast

This episode is brought to you by my courses: PCOS and Food Peace and Dietitians PCOS and Food Peace. You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how.

This episode’s Dear Food letter:

Dear Food, 

I am a former MS, RD who gave up my credentials due to diagnoses of major clinical depression and EDNOS. That was over a decade ago, but I think that at least a part of me may still grieves that decision. (As an aside to Julie: I know you can appreciate the loooong road, dedication and hard work it took to earn those credentials!) 

I had a major weight gain when I began taking prescribed psychiatric medications as an adult. Prior to that, I had no history of “added” pounds as a child or  young adult.

I’ve had two weight loss surgeries: a sleeve gastrectomy a little over a year ago and the lap band before that. I dropped some pounds (~100 with the lap band) prior to the sleeve but the band was removed due to complications of pseudoachalasia. 

I work in group and individual therapy, times many, many years, regarding HAES and intuitive eating. I am healthy, no HTN, diabetes, but I do have severe bilateral knee osteoarthritis that limits my mobility. 

I have questions on several levels. First, how can I be more gentle with myself regarding my professional history? My pride prevents me from sharing my full educational and training background in my group. 

How can I be more gentle with myself regarding my weight loss surgeries? I feel that the sleeve was a mistake, but there is no turning back now…. I haven’t lost any weight since the surgery and, of late, there are times when I binge (having not done so in many years.) 

How can I be more gentle with myself about exercise? I’ve not found my “joyful movement” as an adult just yet. It’s a strain to walk due to my knees. 

Although I want to continue along the road of slowing down my eating and being more mindful at meal/snack times, I find myself just “not doing it.” How do I balance feelings of giving up with the desire to tune into my body? 

Also, my body is large, with hanging flesh. I have a desire to live in a smaller body, thinking that my movement would be less constricted. That said, I realize that “desire” itself may be my actual impediment….     

Your thoughts, feelings and feedback are most welcome.

Sincerely, 

 One of Your Most True Lovers

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

(169) [Rebroadcast] Kimmie Singh on PCOS and Food Peace

While prepping for Season 4 of the Love Food Podcast, I am rebroadcasting conversations on PCOS and Food Peace. Listen as I chat with Kimmie Singh, co-host and Brooklyn-based dietitian, on worthiness and chronic conditions.

This Chapter of the PCOS and Food Peace Podcast is brought to you by Julie’s PCOS and Food Peace course. Get 25% off using the coupon code ‘podcast’ at check out. Get all the details here:

Did you enjoy the podcast? Leave us a rating, review, subscribe or share the podcast! Doing these small acts of kindness help the show grow and connect more with the concept of Food Peace.

Notes:

Thank you to Theralogix, the makers of Ovasitol, for sponsoring the podcast.

  • Ovasitol is an inositol supplement with a blend of myo-inositol and D-chiro-inositol, in the body’s optimal ratio of 40 to 1.
  • Inositols are nutrients that help to decrease insulin resistance, promote menstrual regularity, restore ovulation, and balance hormone levels.
  • In convenient powder form, Ovasitol can be enjoyed in your favorite beverage or smoothie.
  • Available in both a canister and convenient single-serving packets, Ovasitol contains 100% pure inositols, with no additives.
  • Read our blog post about what Inositols can do to help your PCOS.
  • Order online today at theralogix.com. During checkout, use “PRC” code 127410 for an exclusive PCOS and Food Peace Podcast discount.

My past trauma keeps me from healing my relationship with food (Ep 110 with Julie Church and Kara Bazzi)

Are you struggling to accept your body size, even though you’ve made peace with food? Is past trauma still affecting our ability to find true and lasting recovery? Julie Church and Kara Bazzi join me to break down this part of the Food Peace™ journey.

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This episode is brought to you by my online course, Your Step-by-Step Guide to PCOS and Food Peace™. Sign up now to get on the waitlist for the next enrollment period in April, and receive my FREE road map: Your First 3 Steps Toward Food Peace™ with PCOS. You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how

Product links may be affiliate. If you click and make a purchase, there’s no extra cost to you.

Episode’s Key Points:

  • Working with a dietitian and therapist TEAM is so important for full recovery! Julie Church, RD, and Kara Bazzi, therapist, from Opal: Food + Body Wisdom Center join us to talk about this week’s letter.
  • Our eating behaviors are coping mechanisms, and sometimes we have to engage in some disordered behaviors to protect ourselves.
  • Shifting our relationship with our body is SO hard, especially when body hatred has plagued us for so long.
  • Seeking healing means there’s HOPE to find further growth and peace!
  • Our world is so, SO fatphobic, and it wrongly connects our weight to our health and our self-worth. Part of the work is disconnecting weight from these other factors.
  • Making peace with food and acting in self-care through nourishing ourselves does NOT mean you will lose weight, and it does NOT mean you’ll be in a smaller body! Food peace doesn’t equate to thinness.
  • Support yourself through this weight bias we experience by finding community. Advocate for yourself, and demand respect for your body! You deserve safe relationships.
  • Interrogate what’s behind the body hatred! Trauma, weight bias… these things can contribute to us not feeling safe in our bodies and disrupt our body image. Part of the process is striving for a more relational relationship with our bodies. Investigate some somatic work, and dig deep.

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

Thank you for listening to the Love, Food series.

Cultivating support for your PCOS and advocating for better care


Are you or is someone you know affected by PCOS? I have some bonus episodes for you! Listen now for the third bonus episode all about how to self-advocate for your health and find support while struggling with PCOS.

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This episode is brought to you by my online PCOS and Food Peace course.

Product links may be affiliate. If you click and make a purchase, there’s no extra cost to you.

Episode’s Key Points:

  • Be sure to check out the first and second PCOS bonus Love, Food episodes!
  • You shouldn’t have to advocate for yourself, but unfortunately you’ll probably have to… so I have some tips to share!
  • PCOS is a women’s disease, and so there’s not a lot of research about it out there, and people don’t really want to talk about it. Plus, weight gain is a part of PCOS, which makes it even harder to find support because we live in a fatphobia world.
  • BUT, increased support actually helps improve our health! It can lower your blood pressure, help with insulin sensitivity, and so much more. So support is a big deal!
  • Weight bias in the healthcare community is a moral issue!! We have to combat it, and it starts with us.
  • First off, what’s weight stigma? It’s negative attitudes towards a person due to their body size. This leads to prejudice and discrimination, and results in lower quality of care. Stigma also activates a hormone response that ultimately leads to increased insulin resistance, and so much more. AND PCOS is tied closely to weight gain, which means that weight stigma is a BIG deal for those struggling with PCOS!
  • But doesn’t shame help us lose weight and watch what we eat? NO! Shame does NOT promote weight loss, and can in fact lead to more weight gain and avoidance of medical care.
  • The research also shows us that bias within the healthcare community is rampant. That means that as someone with PCOS, you need to walk into the doctor’s office armed with information, and ready to advocate for yourself and protect yourself from weight stigma. Here’s some ways how:
    • Decline to be weighed. You DON’T have to be weighed! It’s NOT a medical necessity, and it can be super triggering.
    • Assert that you don’t need to talk about dieting. Protect your recovery by letting them know that you aren’t interested in talking about weight loss, and that talking about dieting could actually put you at risk for weight gain.
    • Let the doctor know that diets just don’t work. Let them know that diets have never benefitted your health, and demand a different intervention strategy.
    • Ask your doctor what they recommend to patients that are in smaller bodies. There are ZERO conditions that only affect people in larger bodies, and so there are weight-neutral ways to improve your health.
    • Ask for the research! Ask for the data that shows long-term success (sustained weight loss with improved health for five years or more)… it doesn’t exist!
  • It sucks that you even have to do this extra work, but there ARE people out there in the fat activist community who are ready to help you.
  • The last thing we need to talk about is how to find support. Be open with your friends and family about your struggle, find support on social media, try to meet up with folks in person, and head to the PCOS Awareness Symposium!

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

Thank you for listening to the Love, Food series.

Am I doing enough to protect my kids from body hate?? {Episode 103 with Anna Lutz}


Are you trying to protect your kids from all the diet culture messaging out there? Listen now for my chat with friend and colleague, Anna Lutz, while we break down how to help our kids be resilient against this disordered culture.

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This episode is brought to you by my online course, Your Step-by-Step Guide to PCOS and Food Peace™. Sign up now to get on the waitlist for the next enrollment period on January 25th, and receive my FREE road map: Your First 3 Steps Toward Food Peace™ with PCOS. You CAN make peace with food even with PCOS and I want to show you how.

Product links may be affiliate. If you click and make a purchase, there’s no extra cost to you.

Episode’s Key Points:

  • It’s January, and diet culture is EVERYWHERE! I worry a lot about the messages my kids are getting from these commercials and programs… Anna Lutz joins us today to talk about protecting our children from all the diet culture out there!!
  • There’s SO much of raising children that we don’t have any control over. There’s only so much we can do to protect our kids from so many things, from diet culture to bullying.
  • Instead of trying to control everything around your kid, focus on creating a foundation for your child to come back to when they’re confronted with diet culture.
  • Remember, we can do all the “right things,” but their genetics and personality can also play a role in how susceptible they are to diet culture.
  • We can’t change the way the culture perceives our kids’ bodies, but what we CAN do is support our kids in their home and give them a safe haven no matter what goes on outside.
  • Do what you can to talk positively about ALL bodies and talk neutrally about food. Model food and body peace the best you can!
  • Try to have consistent family meals where you can connect and communicate with your kids, and where you can model how to handle food in a neutral way. Research shows that this helps them to be resilient!
  • If your kids encounter fatphobia and tell you about it, start asking questions! Make them think about it, and start a conversation, rather than just trying to correct it. Help them to critically think!!
  • Remember, you’re raising the next generation! Who knows, maybe we’re making the first group of kids who don’t believe in weight bias and diet culture.

Show Notes:

Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. 

Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!

Thank you for listening to the Love, Food series.